Welcome to "Mass Rifle"


The Massachusetts Rifle Association (MRA) was founded on November 4, 1875 and has been the home to many pioneers and innovators in the area of the shooting sports.  Harry M. Pope, the world famous maker of the precision rifle barrels, E.E. Partridge, the inventor of the sights that bear his name and the author Corbin Gould who, in 1885, published "The Rifle", the forerunner to the NRA's "The Rifleman"  all were early members of the MRA who used the club's facilities to put their theories on shooting to the test.

From 1875, with thirty members and horse drawn carriages bringing shooting enthusiasts and Civil War veterans, to the over 1,000 Members that the MRA has today, we have promoted the safety, education, discipline and yes, the fun that can be had while enjoying the shooting sports.

We welcome new shooters as well as "old hands" as members and offer 24 hour card key access to our two indoor ranges (50 and 87 feet) as well as the availability of several outdoor ranges including: a 100 and 200 yard rifle range; a 50 yard rifle/pistol range;  30 foot pistol range; trap field; sporting clays field and archery range.  Our members have gone to the National Matches and many participate on our rifle and pistol teams (beginners welcome and mentoring available at no extra cost) and in various levels of competition.  We also have a very active junior's program to teach young adults the shooting disciplines in a safe and educational environment.

Our welcome to you today is as cordial as that extended by our founders over 125 years ago.  Please feel free to visit us on the web or stop by our offices on Sunday mornings from 9am to 12 noon or Wednesday evenings from 6pm to 8pm where one of our volunteers will be happy to give you a tour.

The future of the Massachusetts Rifle Association...


Will it include YOU?

 

 


 

 
NRA-ILA News
National Rifle Association | NRA-ILA News
  • Supreme Court declines to review California concealed-weapon law
    The Supreme Court will not intervene in a lower court’s decision that the Second Amendment does not protect the right to carry a concealed weapon in public.Gun-rights advocates had asked the court to review a California law that gives local sheriffs power to require that those seeking concealed-carry permits show a particular need, such as a threat.
  • Supreme Court refuses to hear right-to-carry-guns case, Justices Thomas and Gorsuch say there is such a right
    Federal appellate courts and state high courts are split on whether the Second Amendment secures a right for law-abiding adults to carry guns outside the home, and not just possess them in the home. Several federal appellate courts have generally held that states may, if they want to, sharply limit such carrying (e.g., by giving licenses only to people that the police view as unusually vulnerable to attack). The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit and the Illinois Supreme Court, though, have held that the Second Amendment does generally entitle law-abiding adults to carry guns in most public places, though the government may require licensing and training, and regulate how guns are carried. The Florida Supreme Court has stated the same, and some other courts have opined on the matter as well.